1. Chris DessellesRay Morris is on a real roll! Canon 60Da 50mm EF lens “piggyback”. 40x60secs lights, 10 darks, 10 bias. Deep Sky Stacker, Photoshop CS6. That’s all I know. This one is all his, I didn’t touch a thing. (I wouldn’t dare!)

    Chris Desselles

    Ray Morris is on a real roll! Canon 60Da 50mm EF lens “piggyback”. 40x60secs lights, 10 darks, 10 bias. Deep Sky Stacker, Photoshop CS6. That’s all I know. This one is all his, I didn’t touch a thing. (I wouldn’t dare!)

    1 day ago  /  0 notes

  2. NGC 5078 is a spiral galaxy and NGC 5101 a lenticular galaxy, both in the Hydra constellation and both beautifully recorded by Marcus Davies in his first test of our Pro RC360 telescope! That’s very cool! — withGino Bucciol, Cris Ellis, Giovanni Dal Lago and Marcus Davies.

    NGC 5078 is a spiral galaxy and NGC 5101 a lenticular galaxy, both in the Hydra constellation and both beautifully recorded by Marcus Davies in his first test of our Pro RC360 telescope! That’s very cool! — withGino BucciolCris EllisGiovanni Dal Lago and Marcus Davies.

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  3. NGC 1333 picture by Evangelos Souglakos recorded with his Officina Stellare RH200 and QSI 683 CCD camera. Wonderful! — with Gino Bucciol and Giovanni Dal Lago.

    NGC 1333 picture by Evangelos Souglakos recorded with his Officina Stellare RH200 and QSI 683 CCD camera. Wonderful! — with Gino Bucciol and Giovanni Dal Lago.

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  4. Astrodoc - Astrophotography by Ron Brecher

    Astrodoc - Astrophotography by Ron Brecher

    2 days ago  /  0 notes

  5. Tragoolchitr Jittasaiyapan.Messier 52, open cluster in Cassiopeia. SBIG ST-10XME, Takahashi TOA-130 at 780 mm f/6 (with reducer), Astro-physics 900 GTO from Phu Hin Rongkla National Park, Phitsanulok, Thailand. LRGB image, total exposure 69 mins.

    Tragoolchitr Jittasaiyapan.

    Messier 52, open cluster in Cassiopeia. SBIG ST-10XME, Takahashi TOA-130 at 780 mm f/6 (with reducer), Astro-physics 900 GTO from Phu Hin Rongkla National Park, Phitsanulok, Thailand. LRGB image, total exposure 69 mins.

    2 days ago  /  0 notes

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  7. Tragoolchitr Jittasaiyapan‎The Heart and Soul Nebulae in Cassiopeia.SBIG STX-16803 CCD Camera, Takahashi FSQ-106, 530 mm f/5, Astro-physics 900 GTO mount. RHaGB image, taken from my friend’s sliding roof observatory in Moosee, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand. Total exposure 130 minutes.

    Tragoolchitr Jittasaiyapan

    The Heart and Soul Nebulae in Cassiopeia.

    SBIG STX-16803 CCD Camera, Takahashi FSQ-106, 530 mm f/5, Astro-physics 900 GTO mount. RHaGB image, taken from my friend’s sliding roof observatory in Moosee, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand. Total exposure 130 minutes.

    4 days ago  /  0 notes

  8. APOD: The Lagoon Nebula in Stars Dust and Gas (2014 Sep 24)Image Credit & Copyright: Remus Chua (Celestial Portraits)http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140924.htmlExplanation: The large majestic Lagoon Nebula is home for many young stars and hot gas. Spanning 100 light years across while lying only about 5000 light years distant, the Lagoon Nebula is so big and bright that it can be seen without a telescope toward the constellation of Sagittarius. Many bright stars are visible from NGC 6530, an open cluster that formed in the nebula only several million years ago. The greater nebula, also known as M8 and NGC 6523, is named “Lagoon” for the band of dust seen to the left of the open cluster’s center. A bright knot of gas and dust in the nebula’s center is known as the Hourglass Nebula. The featured picture is a newly processed panorama of M8, capturing five times the diameter of the Moon. Star formation continues in the Lagoon Nebula as witnessed by the many globules that exist there.http://celestialportraits.com/Nebulas and Star Clusters Wall Calendar:http://friendsofapod.org/?page_id=42Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Pagehttp://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=140924#APOD

    APOD: The Lagoon Nebula in Stars Dust and Gas (2014 Sep 24)
    Image Credit & Copyright: Remus Chua (Celestial Portraits)
    http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140924.html

    Explanation: The large majestic Lagoon Nebula is home for many young stars and hot gas. Spanning 100 light years across while lying only about 5000 light years distant, the Lagoon Nebula is so big and bright that it can be seen without a telescope toward the constellation of Sagittarius. Many bright stars are visible from NGC 6530, an open cluster that formed in the nebula only several million years ago. The greater nebula, also known as M8 and NGC 6523, is named “Lagoon” for the band of dust seen to the left of the open cluster’s center. A bright knot of gas and dust in the nebula’s center is known as the Hourglass Nebula. The featured picture is a newly processed panorama of M8, capturing five times the diameter of the Moon. Star formation continues in the Lagoon Nebula as witnessed by the many globules that exist there.

    http://celestialportraits.com/

    Nebulas and Star Clusters Wall Calendar:
    http://friendsofapod.org/?page_id=42

    Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page
    http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=140924

    #APOD

    6 days ago  /  0 notes

  9. Happy Hubble Friday!This new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows NGC 7793, a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Sculptor some 13 million light-years away from Earth. NGC 7793 is one of the brightest galaxies in the Sculptor Group, one of the closest groups of galaxies to the Local Group — the group of galaxies containing our galaxy, the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds.The image shows NGC 7793’s spiral arms and small central bulge. Unlike some other spirals, NGC 7793 doesn’t have a very pronounced spiral structure, and its shape is further muddled by the mottled pattern of dark dust that stretches across the frame. The occasional burst of bright pink can be seen in the galaxy, highlighting stellar nurseries containing newly-forming baby stars. Read more: http://1.usa.gov/1pgg2jhCredit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: D. Calzetti (University of Massachusetts) and the LEGUS Team

    Happy Hubble Friday!

    This new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows NGC 7793, a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Sculptor some 13 million light-years away from Earth. NGC 7793 is one of the brightest galaxies in the Sculptor Group, one of the closest groups of galaxies to the Local Group — the group of galaxies containing our galaxy, the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds.

    The image shows NGC 7793’s spiral arms and small central bulge. Unlike some other spirals, NGC 7793 doesn’t have a very pronounced spiral structure, and its shape is further muddled by the mottled pattern of dark dust that stretches across the frame. The occasional burst of bright pink can be seen in the galaxy, highlighting stellar nurseries containing newly-forming baby stars. Read more: http://1.usa.gov/1pgg2jh

    Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: D. Calzetti (University of Massachusetts) and the LEGUS Team

    6 days ago  /  0 notes

  10. Doug Ingram posted a photo to StarWalk's timeline — at Maddens Plains.Good Milky Way hunting. Maddens Plains, Australia, 22 September 2014.I know that stellar selfies with miners’ lamps are getting stale now, but this was my first attempt and the Milky Way was almost begging to be photographed.Canon EOS 6D, Samyang 14mm @ f4, 20sec @ ISO 6400.

    Good Milky Way hunting. Maddens Plains, Australia, 22 September 2014.

    I know that stellar selfies with miners’ lamps are getting stale now, but this was my first attempt and the Milky Way was almost begging to be photographed.

    Canon EOS 6D, Samyang 14mm @ f4, 20sec @ ISO 6400.

    6 days ago  /  0 notes